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Species: Acromyrmex coronatus

Classification:
Download Data

Taxonomic History (provided by Barry Bolton, 2014)

5 subspecies

Formica coronata Fabricius, 1804 PDF: 413 (q.) SOUTH AMERICA. Neotropic. AntCat AntWiki

Taxonomic history

Forel, 1885a PDF: 356 (w.).
Combination in Atta: Roger, 1863b: 35; in Atta (Acromyrmex): Forel, 1885a PDF: 355; in Acromyrmex: Bruch, 1914 PDF: 216.
Subspecies of Acromyrmex hystrix: Forel, 1885a PDF: 355.
Revived status as species: Dalla Torre, 1893 PDF}: 152.
Senior synonym of: Acromyrmex meinerti, Acromyrmex modesta, Acromyrmex moelleri, Acromyrmex ochraceolus and material of the unavailable names Acromyrmex flavescens, Acromyrmex medianus, Acromyrmex obscurior, Acromyrmex ornatus referred here: Gonçalves, 1961 PDF: 135.

Distribution:

Guatemala to Brazil and Ecuador.

Biology:

Natural History:

Acromyrmex coronatus is a montane species found in cloud forest habitats and not in the lowlands. It is tolerant of cold, wet conditions and colonies can be found in small clearings and gaps in dense cloud forest. On the transect on the north side of Volcan Barva it has been found at 1100m elevation but not at 500m or 2000m. On the Central Valley side it has been collected at 1600m elevation at Zurqui. In the Monteverde area it occurs in the community area, up to the highest ridges at 1700m, and down to 800m in the Penas Blancas Valley.

In Monteverde, it is the main pest in gardens and will come into houses at night to cut bread, cabbage, or fruit that has been left out. The nests are often in or under a piece of dead wood, and often with a superstructure of loose dead leaf fragments. They do not excavate soil very extensively if at all. They may be arboreal at times, nesting in a low branch junctions of epiphyte-laden trees.

Lisa Ellis, an undergraduate student with the University of California Education Abroad Program in the late 1980's, carried out a study of A. coronatus foraging during the transition from dry to wet season in Monteverde. She found that foraging was continuous at night, but diurnal foraging only occurred when there had been recent rain. Following a heavy rain, diurnal foraging would commmence followed by a gradual cessation over a period of a day or two. Periodic rains during the dry season would initiate a short bout of diurnal foraging, but when the rains became more continuous diurnal foraging became continuous. Thus the lack of diurnal foraging during the dry season was a short-term response to immediate environmental conditions and not a long-term change in colony foraging behavior.

Nuptial flights are common in Monteverde and the distinctively-patterned dealate queens are often seen on the roads. On 9 July 1984 I observed a swarm of males in the canopy of an emergent oak on the ridge crest above Monteverde. Hundreds of males were swarming just above the highest branches of the tree. Later in the day I saw many dealate queens on the roads.

I have observed aggregations of founding queens under epiphyte mats in recent treefalls. Several times I have seen dealate queens out cutting leaves, suggesting that queens need to forage themselves to establish a colony.

Taxonomic Treatment (provided by Plazi)

Wild, A. L., 2007:
Alto Paraná , Canindeyú , Itapúa (ALWC, INBP, LACM, MZSP, USNM). Literature records: Itapúa (Fowler 1985).

Specimen Habitat Summary

Found most commonly in these habitats: 32 times found in montane wet forest, 21 times found in cloud forest, 16 times found in oak cloud forest, 12 times found in ridgetop cloud forest, 7 times found in mesophil forest, 3 times found in disturbed pine-oak forest, 3 times found in montane rainforest, 1 times found in Liquidambar forest edge, 2 times found in 2º cloud forest, 1 times found in pine oak Liquidambar forest, ...

Collected most commonly using these methods or in the following microhabitats: 34 times search, 37 times Baiting, 17 times Beating, 10 times Malaise, 10 times Sweeping, 8 times MiniWinkler, 4 times flight intercept trap, 4 times MaxiWinkler, 4 times Pan Trap, 3 times Winkler, 1 times hand collecting, ...

Elevations: collected from 550 - 2190 meters, 1387 meters average

Type specimens: Syntype importunus: jtl055816; syntype of Acromyrmex moelleri panamensis ochraceolus: casent0909406; syntype of Acromyrmex coronatus andicola flavescens: casent0912442; syntype of Acromyrmex coronatus andicola medianus: casent0912443; syntype of Acromyrmex coronatus moelleri obscurior: casent0912444; syntype of Atta moelleri: casent0909403, casent0909404; syntype of Atta moelleri meinerti: casent0909402; syntype of Atta moelleri modesta: casent0909405; Syntype rectispina: jtl055817; Syntypes angustatus: jtl055818, jtl055819

(-1 examples)



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